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    Star Trek’s Michael Dorn Thinks Kurn Changed Worf’s Character For The Worse

    Some might accuse Worf of being dismissive of his brother. He may have been willing to accept dishonor, but he perhaps didn’t give full consideration to Kurn, who was already suffering in obscurity, unable to say his family name in public. Worf’s Discommendation would only ensure that Kurn remained just as obscure. One of the episode’s credited story writers, Ron D. Moore, wasn’t so concerned with Kurn’s fate, fearing only that the old-fashioned “you secretly have a relative” story would come across as hackneyed:

    “I thought Tony Todd did a wonderful job as Worf’s brother. […] I was kind of worried, because there’s always that hesitation when you’re bringing in other family members no one else has ever seen. Half the audience is ready to throw things at the screen, and you’re thinking, ‘This better work.’ I was there when he stepped on the stage and made it his own. I was in love with ‘Sins of the Father’ and I fought for it when there was some question about which way we were going to go with it. I really like the fact Worf took it on the chin that episode.”

    The episode’s director, Les Landau, was also thrilled by “Sins of the Father,” feeling that the showrunners were allowed to delve into Klingon politics for the first time. Indeed, Landau noted, that set decorator Jim Meese and art director Richard James both won Emmys for the episode. Across the board, most of the showrunners were proud of “Sins of the Father.”

    Dorn, however, admitted — through his tone — that he was a little miffed at the way the story of “Sins” played out. Up until that episode, he was playing Worf a certain way. After, he begrudgingly had to change. 

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